The Case for Building Better Residential

Residential properties in mega metropolitan cities are often short of satisfaction for occupiers. Many may find their flat small, inefficient, and developers trying to cram in all kinds of features with the hope of justifying its price. This is a result of residential units built to prioritize developer’s profit over end user’s satisfaction. With WFH becoming a well adopted trend due to Covid-19, tenants and occupiers are now reexamining their homes, and demanding higher quality space that is compatible with the current environment, and less so on the building’s location or proximity to the CBD.

Taking the Kennedy Terrace project as an example, a building that was designed with the end user is the priority. With a peerless 3700 sqft for its 3 en-suite standard simplex, it sits comfortably on the top of luxury residential tenants’ shortlist. As a direct consequence of not building 1800 sqft flats, competing with the surrendering offerings, Kennedy Terrace achieved approximately double that of neighboring apartment buildings when compared on a per sqft basis. The ample ceiling height, efficient layout of the unit, and the centralization of the apartment’s electrical system make the flat the ultimate blank canvas for its occupiers to personalize the unit to their heart’s content

Increasingly, landlords and developers of luxury residential sites are now faced with a dichotomy, whether to prioritize the volume of units available, or catering to the undeserved demand for larger space such as Kennedy Terrace. While the decision to provide truly spacious flats at the expense of a number of units may seem counterproductive at the beginning, filling the glaring disconnect between developer and end user’s may be as rewarding, if not more. 

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